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State of the Arts 2012 conference 5 minute round up

State of the Arts 2012 conference 5 minute round up


Good morning
and welcome to the Lowry. I’m so happy to have been
asked to be involved. The instrumental value of the arts to
wealth, to mental and physical health, to education,
to social coherence, is real and enormously,
enormously important. But today is about
the extraordinary and essential role which artists play in our society – their genius, their needs, their contribution
to what matters in all our lives. Delve deep into the music
and the forces fulfilling it to allow the butterfly
to emerge from the chrysalis. What we want to achieve is the long-overdue recognition that the arts sit at the centre of the
changes of what we’re experiencing, not at the periphery. What I hope to get out of the day is how the arts and how artists can
address some of the big questions that face us in society. Artists never have the answers,
necessarily, but what the arts can do is
make us think about the big issues. It’s absolutely paramount that imagination was
part of that journey for all people. 2012 is a watershed year
in terms of arts policy and how we actually find money to support the fantastic arts
that exist in this country. The lack of resources creates a context in which you have
to create something out of nothing. Now, in my personal opinion, I think that is a really good place
to begin making art from. Maybe we’ll ask ourselves
more than ever who is this work for and
what are we saying about ourselves. These are big issues and 2012
is the time to address them. I think that is a really great chance
for us to make some new friends, and to amaze and surprise
and provoke new audiences. That’s half the answer.
The other half, of course, is about how we sustain
the emerging artist. There’s been this huge ambition
to increase participation, increase engagement,
particularly with young people. I think if we fail to capitalise
upon that, post Olympics, then we’ll have failed. I think we need to think
longer-term. When we plan we need to
really look at the audiences and the opportunities
we’re giving people, and making sure that we’re thinking
about the kind of longer term. Not just a kind of
one-off project for people, but really instilling
that kind of ethos of working. And that’s the big challenge
for arts organisations, rather than individual artists, is to stop seeing community and
participatory arts as something separate but to see them
as part of real life. And to make themselves
part of real community life, not an add-on
at the end of the day. You know, it may be that
actually the performing arts should be about not being digital,
about not being on electronic platforms, about being live
and about being here. We need, maybe, more realistic
development opportunities, so that artists are not just developing
in terms of their practice or discipline but are learning about
the business side of the arts. We need to prepare young people
for the real world that’s out there, so that they’re not then having
a really challenging transition from being a participant
to a practising artist. Young people need to understand
that culture and education and art is… has a context.
It fits in the world. It has a political validation,
it can be a social tool. And also they need to know
that they can critique it. …and speak about the work
and make changes… It’s about changing the way
the system is at the moment to allow most young people to make the most of the opportunities
that are available to them, so that they can maximise
their creative output. I think television does do good art. However I do think television
should be doing more art. # It’s moving in the place,
a wind, like a dust # In order to have communication
we got to build trust # Trust between artists and communities # And the funders in the place
and the local authorities # It ain’t this whole thing
about exhalation # It’s also about all the inspiration (record scratch) # Out # Captions by internetsubtitling.com

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